“Please consider standing for the Council…”

First published in Wain's World Salisbury Journal: Photograph of the Author by

… urges Rantone in response to my last offering. Awe gee, shucks, I mean: what, me?

Seriously, the last thing needed at either parish or county level is yet another old bloke. We already have more than our share of old-timers representing us, and some of them have been around a very long time. Surely the real requirement is for younger councillors to add to the mix. Not party political wannabees out to make their CVs look more impressive in 2014, mind you. No, to my mind local councils should include those who are trying to save enough for a deposit on their first house, whose kids are still in junior school, who use buses but don’t have bus passes, and who go to hospital to have babies rather than hip-replacements. But they should also be wise enough to know when it’s time to step down and make way for someone else. At the hospital elected governors aren’t given a choice. You’re allowed a maximum of three terms - nine years - after which you become ineligible. It’s a pity they don’t have the same system in local government.

(Of course, none of the above strictures apply to Rantone, whose perspicacity in spotting latent talent in an old blogger proves how wise we were to elect him - however old he is - to whichever body he represents!)

“What’s it like, being a Samaritan?”

… Asked a fellow diner the other night. It turned out that he’d seen or heard something broadcast about the Sams, and my wife had mentioned to him my own involvement. I couldn’t say much other than that he’d find it satisfying. Right now in Salisbury we need to recruit another 20 listening volunteers, and hopefully some will turn up at Monday’s information evening at the Milford Street branch office. What sort of people do we seek? Those who can listen without giving advice (and that’s not easy), who are not judgemental and not easily shocked, who are calm and reassuring but can act quickly in an emergency. They need also to be able to commit to 15 hours of duty a month. And of course they must be able to keep anything they may hear totally confidential. Interested? Call 01722 323355 and join us for tea and biccies.

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Comments (1)

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1:29pm Thu 8 Dec 11

rantone says...

Chris, I do agree and sympathise with some of your comments, but how political parties encourage 'younger' persons to become involved at parish level is a problem. Taking out the 'party' candidate may help, and then with more independant members arranging times of meetings to suit and not clash with other committments MAY be possible. Even now attendance is varied from some elected members, but I agree a better mix representing our society could bring benefits. For myself I did become involved as a parish councillor at a fairly young age - 27 years, in a village, sitting with retired military officers, but also thoughtful and concerned locals who played an active part in their community on topics like footpaths - rights of way and yes dog mess! All relevant in village life. Not wishing to compete with your own excellent involvement in and around this city, I have served as a school governor and played an active part in local charities and community events, this as a single parent for a period. This requires good planning at home and valued assistance from friends and neighbours- but young people can and do get involved! The Salisbury Area Board this year did elect the youngest of the 8 unitary members as Chairman, so this is a positive in certain ways, although experience within the board can and will be required for guidance at times. For many age should not be a barrier, it is the committment that is needed, and when I do view PMQ's (sorry, but I wish to see how are young leaders fair at the centre) I see Sir Peter Tapsell, age 80+, and making a contribution, and this as a MP since 1959! I sense that you and I Chris do have a little time to serve our City. As a Salisbury NHS Trust member I do value your commitment to the Trust as a governor, and this applies to your colleagues, so well done but please do find the positives in this city, and although not an elected member of the city parish or unitary at Trowbridge these are early days for these respective bodies and also expectations are many in these difficult times. Did 'young' bankers in London cause the debt problems or the more established?
Q. Could it be possible for the Salisbury NHS Trust to administer the 'walk in centre'? Keep blogging and compliments of the season.
Chris, I do agree and sympathise with some of your comments, but how political parties encourage 'younger' persons to become involved at parish level is a problem. Taking out the 'party' candidate may help, and then with more independant members arranging times of meetings to suit and not clash with other committments MAY be possible. Even now attendance is varied from some elected members, but I agree a better mix representing our society could bring benefits. For myself I did become involved as a parish councillor at a fairly young age - 27 years, in a village, sitting with retired military officers, but also thoughtful and concerned locals who played an active part in their community on topics like footpaths - rights of way and yes dog mess! All relevant in village life. Not wishing to compete with your own excellent involvement in and around this city, I have served as a school governor and played an active part in local charities and community events, this as a single parent for a period. This requires good planning at home and valued assistance from friends and neighbours- but young people can and do get involved! The Salisbury Area Board this year did elect the youngest of the 8 unitary members as Chairman, so this is a positive in certain ways, although experience within the board can and will be required for guidance at times. For many age should not be a barrier, it is the committment that is needed, and when I do view PMQ's (sorry, but I wish to see how are young leaders fair at the centre) I see Sir Peter Tapsell, age 80+, and making a contribution, and this as a MP since 1959! I sense that you and I Chris do have a little time to serve our City. As a Salisbury NHS Trust member I do value your commitment to the Trust as a governor, and this applies to your colleagues, so well done but please do find the positives in this city, and although not an elected member of the city parish or unitary at Trowbridge these are early days for these respective bodies and also expectations are many in these difficult times. Did 'young' bankers in London cause the debt problems or the more established? Q. Could it be possible for the Salisbury NHS Trust to administer the 'walk in centre'? Keep blogging and compliments of the season. rantone
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