Plan for dealing with excluded pupils

Plan for dealing with excluded pupils

First published in Education by

EDUCATION chiefs at Wiltshire Council want to continue with an experimental way of dealing with expelled pupils.

Since 2012, 28 out of the 29 secondary schools in the county have taken over responsibility for the pupils they exclude permanently.

The schools are given money which they can use to buy special provision for the pupils, sometimes in small external units run by contracted providers. Their exam results are then included in the schools’ overall results.

A report to Wiltshire Council’s Cabinet says since the trial started, the number of permanently excluded pupils has fallen to “virtually zero” and there are signs that pupils who are excluded permanently or for a fixed period, are achieving more. Headteachers have also given the scheme their backing.

The trial was promoted by the Department for Education and in Wiltshire the council opted to close the Pupil Referral Unit, which was where excluded pupils were previously educated, along with the Young People’s Support Service, which had been put into special measures by Ofsted in 2011.

About £2.6m that had been spent on these services was then diverted to the secondary schools to pay for the provision for permanently excluded pupils.

A report from Wiltshire Council’s corporate director Carolyn Godfrey to the Cabinet says that last year 28 excluded pupils were in full-time alternative provision and 596 were on in-house programmes.

She says the idea of the trial scheme is to make schools more accountable “and therefore to raise the achievement of a very vulnerable group of young people”.

Her report says the trial period for the scheme officially ends in July and asks the Cabinet meeting, being held on Tuesday, to consider setting up an agreement with schools for the scheme to continue.

Ms Godfrey says the pilot scheme is working well and any change would cause “considerable turbulence” to the pupils.

Comments (3)

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6:49pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Champers says...

The reason the figures 'appear' to look so impressive is because:

A) It is extremely paperwork heavy to exclude a pupil despite evidence of violence to others, offensive language and threatening behaviour. If a child has special needs, they are exempted from many of the usual constraints and expectations of behaviour and so their case, the situation often has to be particularly extreme before action can be taken.

B) under the 'new start' policy, if a child is permanently excluded, a school must take on a child in a similar situation from another school. Most schools are understandably reluctant to do this as it is often 'better the devil you know' than having to adjust and make provision for an unknown quantity.

C) exclusions on your figures don't look good on league tables so most schools like to keep things in house and attempt crisis management of behaviour rather than escalate disciplinary measures. Fine for short term control but building a massive future problem as the child realises there are no sanctions or consequences.
The reason the figures 'appear' to look so impressive is because: A) It is extremely paperwork heavy to exclude a pupil despite evidence of violence to others, offensive language and threatening behaviour. If a child has special needs, they are exempted from many of the usual constraints and expectations of behaviour and so their case, the situation often has to be particularly extreme before action can be taken. B) under the 'new start' policy, if a child is permanently excluded, a school must take on a child in a similar situation from another school. Most schools are understandably reluctant to do this as it is often 'better the devil you know' than having to adjust and make provision for an unknown quantity. C) exclusions on your figures don't look good on league tables so most schools like to keep things in house and attempt crisis management of behaviour rather than escalate disciplinary measures. Fine for short term control but building a massive future problem as the child realises there are no sanctions or consequences. Champers
  • Score: 3

4:37pm Sat 8 Feb 14

gingin says...

Champers wrote:
The reason the figures 'appear' to look so impressive is because:

A) It is extremely paperwork heavy to exclude a pupil despite evidence of violence to others, offensive language and threatening behaviour. If a child has special needs, they are exempted from many of the usual constraints and expectations of behaviour and so their case, the situation often has to be particularly extreme before action can be taken.

B) under the 'new start' policy, if a child is permanently excluded, a school must take on a child in a similar situation from another school. Most schools are understandably reluctant to do this as it is often 'better the devil you know' than having to adjust and make provision for an unknown quantity.

C) exclusions on your figures don't look good on league tables so most schools like to keep things in house and attempt crisis management of behaviour rather than escalate disciplinary measures. Fine for short term control but building a massive future problem as the child realises there are no sanctions or consequences.
Well said Champers.
[quote][p][bold]Champers[/bold] wrote: The reason the figures 'appear' to look so impressive is because: A) It is extremely paperwork heavy to exclude a pupil despite evidence of violence to others, offensive language and threatening behaviour. If a child has special needs, they are exempted from many of the usual constraints and expectations of behaviour and so their case, the situation often has to be particularly extreme before action can be taken. B) under the 'new start' policy, if a child is permanently excluded, a school must take on a child in a similar situation from another school. Most schools are understandably reluctant to do this as it is often 'better the devil you know' than having to adjust and make provision for an unknown quantity. C) exclusions on your figures don't look good on league tables so most schools like to keep things in house and attempt crisis management of behaviour rather than escalate disciplinary measures. Fine for short term control but building a massive future problem as the child realises there are no sanctions or consequences.[/p][/quote]Well said Champers. gingin
  • Score: 1

2:05pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Friend of the People says...

Suggest that such an arrangement might be just the place to send some of those Conservative councillors who so shamelessly barracked and jeered members of the public at the Wiltshire Council meeting called to stop the massive increase in councillors' allowances.
Suggest that such an arrangement might be just the place to send some of those Conservative councillors who so shamelessly barracked and jeered members of the public at the Wiltshire Council meeting called to stop the massive increase in councillors' allowances. Friend of the People
  • Score: 1

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