A-level genius Wajih Ahmed bags place on degree course aged just 14

Salisbury Journal: Wajih Ahmed Wajih Ahmed

HE will be too young to drive to his university campus, drink alcohol at the students’ union bar, or enjoy late night parties during freshers’ week.

He is not even old enough to watch the 15-rated Hollywood blockbuster Ted at the cinema .

But, come September, 14-year-old child prodigy Wajih Ahmed will make history, when he enrols on an Economics degree at the University of Southampton .

While hundreds of students across Hampshire will have had sleepless nights ahead of today’s all important Alevel results, talented teenager Wajih knows he has already done enough to secure his place at university, after bagging A* grades in maths and further maths, as well as an A grade in chemistry, last year.

And today he is set to add even more qualifications to his impressive CV, when he picks up results for physics and AS economics, from Barton Peveril College, in Eastleigh .

But no matter what those papers reveal, it is believed that Wajih, from Bere Close, Chandler’s Ford , will become the youngest student ever to study at the university – and one of the youngest to enrol at any university in the UK.

His feat is eclipsed only by Ruth Lawrence, who graduated from Oxford University in 1985, aged just 13.

Wajih, who dreams of becoming an actuary in the finance sector, said: “It’s been my plan for a few years now to start university at 14. It’s been a lot of hard work, but it’s been worth it.

“There might be some natural talent there, but I study for about two hours a day and I think that a lot of children could achieve what I have if they put their minds to it.”

Wajih, whose hobbies include playing football and Xbox, added: “University is definitely going to be harder, but I have three years to concentrate on one subject now, so that will be good and I’m really looking forward to it.”

His parents, Usman, 46, and Saadia, 40, told the Daily Echo of their pride at their son’s achievement.

Usman, who works for the Ministry of Defence, said: “I cannot find the words to express my pride.

“When I look back at my childhood, I couldn’t even have dreamed of gaining the achievements that Wajih has managed.”

Professor Debra Humphris, Pro Vice- Chancellor Education at the University of Southampton, said: “We are delighted to welcome Wajih to the University of Southampton together with all new and returning students and congratulate them all on their exams results. “Like all undergraduates, Wajih will receive the highest levels of support, guidance and help throughout his degree. We hope he will enjoy his time at the University of Southampton.”

But Wajih’s record is already under threat, with younger brother Zohaib hoping to follow in his older brother’s footsteps. The 12-year-old became the youngest child in history to get a top grade A-level, at the tender age of nine.

And he is aiming to emulate his brother by joining him as a student at the University of Southampton in two years’ time.

The duo will pick up a host of GCSE results from Thornden School next Thursday, before jetting off on a celebratory family holiday to New York.

Wajih’s results so far:

  • GCSE Maths A*
  • GCSE Science A*A*A*
  • GCSE Statistics A*
  • GCSE RE A*
  • A level Maths A*
  • A level Further Maths A*
  • A level Chemistry A
  • AS level Physics A

Comments (10)

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11:08am Thu 16 Aug 12

Of the Ilk says...

An academic genius and well done on the exam results. However, is a university, designed for 18 to 20 somethings, the right place for a 14 year old to be. He is just a child and should be allowed to be a child and not a forced adult.
An academic genius and well done on the exam results. However, is a university, designed for 18 to 20 somethings, the right place for a 14 year old to be. He is just a child and should be allowed to be a child and not a forced adult. Of the Ilk

11:56am Thu 16 Aug 12

Shoong says...

I'm sure his parents must be proud as it doesn't look like they had the opportunities that Wajih had but I just hope this doesn't mean the end of his childhood - he's only 14 - and you only get it once.
I'm sure his parents must be proud as it doesn't look like they had the opportunities that Wajih had but I just hope this doesn't mean the end of his childhood - he's only 14 - and you only get it once. Shoong

1:13pm Thu 16 Aug 12

boobooj says...

And I didn't think students couldn't get more childish ;-)
And I didn't think students couldn't get more childish ;-) boobooj

7:08pm Thu 16 Aug 12

Huffter says...

Why?
Why? Huffter

9:54pm Thu 16 Aug 12

freemantlegirl2 says...

Well done on his fantastic results.... but I think Uni is the wrong place for a 14 year old, he should be with his peers. 14 is a very tender age, academic achievement doesn't mean he's 'mature'. :( :(
Well done on his fantastic results.... but I think Uni is the wrong place for a 14 year old, he should be with his peers. 14 is a very tender age, academic achievement doesn't mean he's 'mature'. :( :( freemantlegirl2

9:59pm Thu 16 Aug 12

Mr. Ducke says...

I disagree with the comments that he should be with his "peers" - meaning peers in age. If he spent the next 4 years not being challenged intellectually, his life could take a negative course. He can still be 14 with friends at home, but he deserves to be in a classroom suited to his abilities. There are many cases of students like this in the US who have done very well.
I disagree with the comments that he should be with his "peers" - meaning peers in age. If he spent the next 4 years not being challenged intellectually, his life could take a negative course. He can still be 14 with friends at home, but he deserves to be in a classroom suited to his abilities. There are many cases of students like this in the US who have done very well. Mr. Ducke

10:23pm Thu 16 Aug 12

Poppy22 says...

Mr. Ducke wrote:
I disagree with the comments that he should be with his "peers" - meaning peers in age. If he spent the next 4 years not being challenged intellectually, his life could take a negative course. He can still be 14 with friends at home, but he deserves to be in a classroom suited to his abilities. There are many cases of students like this in the US who have done very well.
Exactly. Great to see this. I'm assuming he won't be living on campus so won't be swayed by an 18-year old social lifestyle, which could be damaging. There's no reason we shouldn't see more young students achieving this in the future too.
Well done to him and his parents.
[quote][p][bold]Mr. Ducke[/bold] wrote: I disagree with the comments that he should be with his "peers" - meaning peers in age. If he spent the next 4 years not being challenged intellectually, his life could take a negative course. He can still be 14 with friends at home, but he deserves to be in a classroom suited to his abilities. There are many cases of students like this in the US who have done very well.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Great to see this. I'm assuming he won't be living on campus so won't be swayed by an 18-year old social lifestyle, which could be damaging. There's no reason we shouldn't see more young students achieving this in the future too. Well done to him and his parents. Poppy22

12:26am Fri 17 Aug 12

ameliaS says...

I can remember when most girls and boys left school at age 15 and were thrust into the adult world of work, like it or not it was the norm. If these boys are happy and prefer to run ahead of the conveyor belt others their age are on, good luck. So many kids now don't know what they want to do in life and talk of "going to uni" as an end goal with no real aspiration or calling to do anything beyond that.
I can remember when most girls and boys left school at age 15 and were thrust into the adult world of work, like it or not it was the norm. If these boys are happy and prefer to run ahead of the conveyor belt others their age are on, good luck. So many kids now don't know what they want to do in life and talk of "going to uni" as an end goal with no real aspiration or calling to do anything beyond that. ameliaS

9:31am Fri 17 Aug 12

CharlieK says...

This is brilliant for him and his family. I can't help agreeing with ameliaS. And it's always good to see a positive story about young people, most of whom are excellent kids.

My problem is how does a 14 year old decide he wants to be a financial Actuary! Is the an X-box game called Call of Booty: Modern Banking? :-)

Go for it, Wajih!
This is brilliant for him and his family. I can't help agreeing with ameliaS. And it's always good to see a positive story about young people, most of whom are excellent kids. My problem is how does a 14 year old decide he wants to be a financial Actuary! Is the an X-box game called Call of Booty: Modern Banking? :-) Go for it, Wajih! CharlieK

12:34pm Fri 17 Aug 12

peenut81 says...

Hopefully he's intelligent enough to realise that the subject of economics is baloney. No point trying to become an actuary when traditional Economics does not teach you money supply or how banking ACTUALLY works.
Hopefully he's intelligent enough to realise that the subject of economics is baloney. No point trying to become an actuary when traditional Economics does not teach you money supply or how banking ACTUALLY works. peenut81

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