Man admits claiming benefits while having two jobs

First published in News by

A SALISBURY man has been spared a prison term after falsely claiming benefits while he had two jobs.

Paul Cook, 47, of Barnard Street, was picked up on a police warrant on January 17 after he failed to attend court on December 6.

He admitted four charges relating to undeclared work while he was claiming Jobseekers Allowance, housing benefit and council tax benefit when he appeared at Salisbury Magistrates Court on January 17.

He was caught following a joint investigation by Wiltshire Council and the Department for Work and Pensions which revealed he had two jobs he had failed to declare, resulting in a loss to public funds of £3,626.

He was given a three-year conditional discharge and ordered to pay a £15 victim surcharge. He will also have to repay the benefit he received.

Comments (2)

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8:03pm Mon 27 Jan 14

IanMcL says...

Where does that leave our Police 'no cells and nine jobs' McPherson who also talked public funds?

2 Jobs = 2 years

9 Jobs = 9 years?

Additives for nicking our nick and cells?
Where does that leave our Police 'no cells and nine jobs' McPherson who also talked public funds? 2 Jobs = 2 years 9 Jobs = 9 years? Additives for nicking our nick and cells? IanMcL
  • Score: 9

4:47am Tue 28 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

Fair enough but, how come we never hear about the millions of people in full time work that still need to claim benefits to survive?

"The report examines the main areas of social security spending – which is set to be £9.2bn a year more than originally forecast by 2014-15 – and finds that rising in-work poverty, caused by real wage falls and the concentration of new jobs in low paying industries, is the main cause of over-spending.
The biggest area of social security over-spending – £2.6bn a year by 2014-15 – is on tax credits, two-thirds of which are going to working households. Recent figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that the number of middle-income families receiving tax credits has almost doubled in the last five years.
This overspend is a result of falling real incomes leaving more working families in need of tax credit support – and has come in spite of cuts to tax credits that have left some families thousands of pounds a year worse off, says the TUC.
The next biggest area of overspending – £2.5bn a year by 2014-15 – is on housing benefit. This overspending is also likely to be due to rising in-work poverty as most of the increase in the housing benefit caseload since 2010 comes from working families.
The report follows recent TUC research which found that workers are experiencing the longest real wage squeeze in over a century – average weekly earnings growth has trailed inflation since late 2009 – and that 80 per cent of net job creation under the coalition has taken place in industries paying less than £8 an hour on average.
ONS figures published yesterday found that real household disposable income per head has fallen sharply in recent years and is now back at its 2005 level.
Rising in-work poverty is causing real hardship for families and a headache for government, which is overspending by billions on social security payments and is receiving less in tax revenues, says the TUC."


These millions of people in work but needing to claim benefits to survive aren't scroungers at all and yet we hear very little from the government regarding their plight.
Fair enough but, how come we never hear about the millions of people in full time work that still need to claim benefits to survive? "The report examines the main areas of social security spending – which is set to be £9.2bn a year more than originally forecast by 2014-15 – and finds that rising in-work poverty, caused by real wage falls and the concentration of new jobs in low paying industries, is the main cause of over-spending. The biggest area of social security over-spending – £2.6bn a year by 2014-15 – is on tax credits, two-thirds of which are going to working households. Recent figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that the number of middle-income families receiving tax credits has almost doubled in the last five years. This overspend is a result of falling real incomes leaving more working families in need of tax credit support – and has come in spite of cuts to tax credits that have left some families thousands of pounds a year worse off, says the TUC. The next biggest area of overspending – £2.5bn a year by 2014-15 – is on housing benefit. This overspending is also likely to be due to rising in-work poverty as most of the increase in the housing benefit caseload since 2010 comes from working families. The report follows recent TUC research which found that workers are experiencing the longest real wage squeeze in over a century – average weekly earnings growth has trailed inflation since late 2009 – and that 80 per cent of net job creation under the coalition has taken place in industries paying less than £8 an hour on average. ONS figures published yesterday found that real household disposable income per head has fallen sharply in recent years and is now back at its 2005 level. Rising in-work poverty is causing real hardship for families and a headache for government, which is overspending by billions on social security payments and is receiving less in tax revenues, says the TUC." These millions of people in work but needing to claim benefits to survive aren't scroungers at all and yet we hear very little from the government regarding their plight. karlmarx
  • Score: 9

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