Decision made to close Hillcote

First published in News by

CAMPAIGNERS have been left bitterly disappointed as Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) decide the will closure Salisbury’s only respite home for severely disabled children.

The decision was taken at a meeting on Tuesday attended by members of the Save Hillcote group, which has been calling on the CCG to consider alternatives to closing the home.

Chairman Angela Scott said: “We are obviously very disappointed and I still don’t think they have given full consideration to the alternatives we were suggesting, such as using smaller premises locally.

“Whatever they say, I think people south of Salisbury Plain will have a reduced service.”

The CCG, together with Wiltshire Council, have been consulting on closing the home and following concerns expressed by parents and carers of children affected they agreed to delay the closure until March, 2015.

A petition with about 5,000 signatures against the proposed closure of Hillcote was sent to the CCG ahead of the meeting, and members agreed to develop a new specialist carers service with a minimum of two specialist carers in South Wiltshire and to invest in the children’s learning disability service to provide additional support to families.

Julia Cramp, joint associate director for the CCG and Wiltshire Council, said the delay in closing Hillcote was as a direct result of the concerns expressed by parents about whether the specialist carers service could be made to work.

She said: “The proposal to delay the closure gives more time to put a specialist carers scheme in place and for plans to be made with families who currently use Hillcote.”

She also said if families did not want to use specialist carers to send their children to for respite, Canon’s House respite home in Devizes was available and alternative respite facilities outside the county, for example in Dorset, were being considered. She said Canon’s House currently operates at 85 per cent capacity and had additional facilities to Hillcote, such as a hydrotherapy pool.

But parents in Salisbury say the 25-mile trip to Devizes would put their children’s health at risk and are worried how they will get to them in an emergency.

They have also raised concerns about how foster carers will manage bigger teenagers with complex needs and sometimes severe behavioural problems.

The CCG will receive an update on what progress is being made in developing the alternative service later in the year.

Comments (20)

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8:15pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Schoolmum999 says...

This really saddens me. This is just wrong and Wiltshire Council should be ashamed.
This really saddens me. This is just wrong and Wiltshire Council should be ashamed. Schoolmum999
  • Score: 14

10:54am Wed 29 Jan 14

journalist1 says...

So much for 'public consultation', then.
So much for 'public consultation', then. journalist1
  • Score: 15

4:01am Thu 30 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

And...

Wiltshire Council are planning to cut 24 youth services and up to 144 youth workers. These cuts include losing Bass Connection based at Grovesnor House in Salisbury. This service has provided the opportunity for thousands of young people to not only build on their music skills but provide invaluable support and mentoring not available elsewhere.

Will there be anything left of Salisbury come spring 2015?
And... Wiltshire Council are planning to cut 24 youth services and up to 144 youth workers. These cuts include losing Bass Connection based at Grovesnor House in Salisbury. This service has provided the opportunity for thousands of young people to not only build on their music skills but provide invaluable support and mentoring not available elsewhere. Will there be anything left of Salisbury come spring 2015? karlmarx
  • Score: 4

4:10pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Petera says...

journalist1 wrote:
So much for 'public consultation', then.
You should know by now that for Wiltshire Council "consultation" only means a public relations exercise that they indulge in before they do exactly whatever they were going to do in the first place. You only have to look at the shambles over Salisbury police station to see that.
[quote][p][bold]journalist1[/bold] wrote: So much for 'public consultation', then.[/p][/quote]You should know by now that for Wiltshire Council "consultation" only means a public relations exercise that they indulge in before they do exactly whatever they were going to do in the first place. You only have to look at the shambles over Salisbury police station to see that. Petera
  • Score: 18

4:47pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Richard Clewer says...

Firstly, Karl please don't scare monger about the youth service. The Youth Service review does not include the targeted element of the Youth Service (which we are building new facilities for at the Campus). Bass connections is part of the targeted service, we are building them a dedicated room in the Campus and my understanding is that they are not part of the current process. Scaring Young People by saying that Bass Connections will close when that is not intended is extremely poor behaviour.

The youth review is looking at several options, one of which is handing control of budgets for open access youth provision to Area Boards so they can make sure they are provided in a way that is relevant to local people. The Youth Service does a great job but only 8% of young people use its services.

Back to Hillcote, the decision there has been made by the Clinical Commissioning Group, not Wiltshire Council. Just as the Police Station move is being decided on by the police, not Wiltshire Council.

The issues around Hillcote are complex (having attended several meetings on the subject). There is a national movement towards more foster based respite care and less residential based respite care. This is apparently (and I can't say how true it is but the experts have told us) driven by parents of children with learning disabilities.

What we have achieved is to delay the closure by 18 months to ensure that all children either move on due to their age or are settled elsewhere. I have also made sure we have a guarantee that the foster services will be in place before we loose Hillcote.
Firstly, Karl please don't scare monger about the youth service. The Youth Service review does not include the targeted element of the Youth Service (which we are building new facilities for at the Campus). Bass connections is part of the targeted service, we are building them a dedicated room in the Campus and my understanding is that they are not part of the current process. Scaring Young People by saying that Bass Connections will close when that is not intended is extremely poor behaviour. The youth review is looking at several options, one of which is handing control of budgets for open access youth provision to Area Boards so they can make sure they are provided in a way that is relevant to local people. The Youth Service does a great job but only 8% of young people use its services. Back to Hillcote, the decision there has been made by the Clinical Commissioning Group, not Wiltshire Council. Just as the Police Station move is being decided on by the police, not Wiltshire Council. The issues around Hillcote are complex (having attended several meetings on the subject). There is a national movement towards more foster based respite care and less residential based respite care. This is apparently (and I can't say how true it is but the experts have told us) driven by parents of children with learning disabilities. What we have achieved is to delay the closure by 18 months to ensure that all children either move on due to their age or are settled elsewhere. I have also made sure we have a guarantee that the foster services will be in place before we loose Hillcote. Richard Clewer
  • Score: -6

5:49pm Thu 30 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

Richard Clewer wrote:
Firstly, Karl please don't scare monger about the youth service. The Youth Service review does not include the targeted element of the Youth Service (which we are building new facilities for at the Campus). Bass connections is part of the targeted service, we are building them a dedicated room in the Campus and my understanding is that they are not part of the current process. Scaring Young People by saying that Bass Connections will close when that is not intended is extremely poor behaviour.

The youth review is looking at several options, one of which is handing control of budgets for open access youth provision to Area Boards so they can make sure they are provided in a way that is relevant to local people. The Youth Service does a great job but only 8% of young people use its services.

Back to Hillcote, the decision there has been made by the Clinical Commissioning Group, not Wiltshire Council. Just as the Police Station move is being decided on by the police, not Wiltshire Council.

The issues around Hillcote are complex (having attended several meetings on the subject). There is a national movement towards more foster based respite care and less residential based respite care. This is apparently (and I can't say how true it is but the experts have told us) driven by parents of children with learning disabilities.

What we have achieved is to delay the closure by 18 months to ensure that all children either move on due to their age or are settled elsewhere. I have also made sure we have a guarantee that the foster services will be in place before we loose Hillcote.
That decision has not been made, yet, as the article mentions these are proposed cuts...

"Scores of youth workers could face redundancy and youth clubs could close under Wiltshire Council plans to save £500,000 from its budget.

Unions have been called to redundancy consultation meetings to be held in Chippenham, Trowbridge and Salisbury on Friday.

Officers for union Unite say they have seen documents that outline four proposals for change to youth workers at the meetings. There will then be a consultation period which will end on April 22 when the Wiltshire Council cabinet will make a decision.

In the worst case scenario the union says all 144 members of staff would be made redundant and 24 youth centres would close.

Unite regional officer Alan Tomala said: “We face the real possibility that by the end of August we will have no youth workers, empty youth centres boarded up and young people hanging around outside them with nothing to do."

So it's not 'scaremongering' as you claim, simply reporting the current situation pending the meeting on 'saving' £500,000 from Wiltshire council. If they hadn't squandered £3 million on Chinese paving slabs then awarded themselves whopping £19,000 pay rises and allowance increases of 35% then there might be some money for these services they propose to cut!
And where has the creche gone from the leisure centre? Or isn't that a service?
[quote][p][bold]Richard Clewer[/bold] wrote: Firstly, Karl please don't scare monger about the youth service. The Youth Service review does not include the targeted element of the Youth Service (which we are building new facilities for at the Campus). Bass connections is part of the targeted service, we are building them a dedicated room in the Campus and my understanding is that they are not part of the current process. Scaring Young People by saying that Bass Connections will close when that is not intended is extremely poor behaviour. The youth review is looking at several options, one of which is handing control of budgets for open access youth provision to Area Boards so they can make sure they are provided in a way that is relevant to local people. The Youth Service does a great job but only 8% of young people use its services. Back to Hillcote, the decision there has been made by the Clinical Commissioning Group, not Wiltshire Council. Just as the Police Station move is being decided on by the police, not Wiltshire Council. The issues around Hillcote are complex (having attended several meetings on the subject). There is a national movement towards more foster based respite care and less residential based respite care. This is apparently (and I can't say how true it is but the experts have told us) driven by parents of children with learning disabilities. What we have achieved is to delay the closure by 18 months to ensure that all children either move on due to their age or are settled elsewhere. I have also made sure we have a guarantee that the foster services will be in place before we loose Hillcote.[/p][/quote]That decision has not been made, yet, as the article mentions these are proposed cuts... "Scores of youth workers could face redundancy and youth clubs could close under Wiltshire Council plans to save £500,000 from its budget. Unions have been called to redundancy consultation meetings to be held in Chippenham, Trowbridge and Salisbury on Friday. Officers for union Unite say they have seen documents that outline four proposals for change to youth workers at the meetings. There will then be a consultation period which will end on April 22 when the Wiltshire Council cabinet will make a decision. In the worst case scenario the union says all 144 members of staff would be made redundant and 24 youth centres would close. Unite regional officer Alan Tomala said: “We face the real possibility that by the end of August we will have no youth workers, empty youth centres boarded up and young people hanging around outside them with nothing to do." So it's not 'scaremongering' as you claim, simply reporting the current situation pending the meeting on 'saving' £500,000 from Wiltshire council. If they hadn't squandered £3 million on Chinese paving slabs then awarded themselves whopping £19,000 pay rises and allowance increases of 35% then there might be some money for these services they propose to cut! And where has the creche gone from the leisure centre? Or isn't that a service? karlmarx
  • Score: 5

5:50pm Thu 30 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

That decision has not been made, yet, as the article mentions these are proposed cuts...

"Scores of youth workers could face redundancy and youth clubs could close under Wiltshire Council plans to save £500,000 from its budget.

Unions have been called to redundancy consultation meetings to be held in Chippenham, Trowbridge and Salisbury on Friday.

Officers for union Unite say they have seen documents that outline four proposals for change to youth workers at the meetings. There will then be a consultation period which will end on April 22 when the Wiltshire Council cabinet will make a decision.

In the worst case scenario the union says all 144 members of staff would be made redundant and 24 youth centres would close.

Unite regional officer Alan Tomala said: “We face the real possibility that by the end of August we will have no youth workers, empty youth centres boarded up and young people hanging around outside them with nothing to do."

So it's not 'scaremongering' as you claim, simply reporting the current situation pending the meeting on 'saving' £500,000 from Wiltshire council. If they hadn't squandered £3 million on Chinese paving slabs then awarded themselves whopping £19,000 pay rises and allowance increases of 35% then there might be some money for these services they propose to cut!
And where has the creche gone from the leisure centre? Or isn't that a service?
That decision has not been made, yet, as the article mentions these are proposed cuts... "Scores of youth workers could face redundancy and youth clubs could close under Wiltshire Council plans to save £500,000 from its budget. Unions have been called to redundancy consultation meetings to be held in Chippenham, Trowbridge and Salisbury on Friday. Officers for union Unite say they have seen documents that outline four proposals for change to youth workers at the meetings. There will then be a consultation period which will end on April 22 when the Wiltshire Council cabinet will make a decision. In the worst case scenario the union says all 144 members of staff would be made redundant and 24 youth centres would close. Unite regional officer Alan Tomala said: “We face the real possibility that by the end of August we will have no youth workers, empty youth centres boarded up and young people hanging around outside them with nothing to do." So it's not 'scaremongering' as you claim, simply reporting the current situation pending the meeting on 'saving' £500,000 from Wiltshire council. If they hadn't squandered £3 million on Chinese paving slabs then awarded themselves whopping £19,000 pay rises and allowance increases of 35% then there might be some money for these services they propose to cut! And where has the creche gone from the leisure centre? Or isn't that a service? karlmarx
  • Score: 0

6:13pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Richard Clewer says...

The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not).

You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic.

What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand.
The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not). You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic. What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand. Richard Clewer
  • Score: 0

7:45pm Thu 30 Jan 14

Grampie says...

Richard Clewer wrote:
The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not).

You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic.

What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand.
Chinese granite is slippery when wet and icy for a kick off.

The fact there are less expensive and just as attractive and hard wearing surfaces that were available and made by people in this country is another reason why people scoff at those politicians who approved their use.

Paid for by money put up by the profligate Labour government who would have liked it spent on jobs for British workers and spent like it was going out of fashion by Conservatives in charge of Wiltshire.
[quote][p][bold]Richard Clewer[/bold] wrote: The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not). You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic. What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand.[/p][/quote]Chinese granite is slippery when wet and icy for a kick off. The fact there are less expensive and just as attractive and hard wearing surfaces that were available and made by people in this country is another reason why people scoff at those politicians who approved their use. Paid for by money put up by the profligate Labour government who would have liked it spent on jobs for British workers and spent like it was going out of fashion by Conservatives in charge of Wiltshire. Grampie
  • Score: 8

3:12am Fri 31 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

Richard Clewer wrote:
The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not).

You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic.

What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand.
The waste of £3 million which could have been better spent on things that actually need doing, cue excuses...
[quote][p][bold]Richard Clewer[/bold] wrote: The article quotes a union official who is commenting on what is currently a part 2 (not yet in the public arena because in this case of the need to brief staff) document. Any consultation involving changes of, for example, the creation of a staff co-operative, requires that all staff be told that they are at risk (even if they are not). You are trying to score a political point using incorrect information in a way that will worry young people. Not the responsible way to approach the topic. What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand.[/p][/quote]The waste of £3 million which could have been better spent on things that actually need doing, cue excuses... karlmarx
  • Score: 9

3:34am Fri 31 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

And by the way, we were all scaremongering about the closure of our police station, look what happened, scattered about the place like confetti at a wedding, when someone gets around to actually building something.
And by the way, we were all scaremongering about the closure of our police station, look what happened, scattered about the place like confetti at a wedding, when someone gets around to actually building something. karlmarx
  • Score: 6

8:43am Fri 31 Jan 14

Lady Tinky Winky says...

Woo boys!
Lets get back to what this was all about at the beginning, the closure of Hillcote!
I just look at this from a compassionate human view. Children with severe disabilties need their comfort zones of places and people they know, being local for parents is also a very strong concern for practical reasons.
As for specialist carers, how many of those are you going to find that are actually up to the job!
My concern is, I volunteer in several places and I am always amazed at how many incompentent managers there are and who gave them the jobs.So in a delicate situation like this if the heartless people that have made this decision will let a team of parents of disabled children choose the candidates they would think suitable for this very demanding job rather than their choices at least that would be showing they are considering the parents in all this rather than the main issue of saving money.
Woo boys! Lets get back to what this was all about at the beginning, the closure of Hillcote! I just look at this from a compassionate human view. Children with severe disabilties need their comfort zones of places and people they know, being local for parents is also a very strong concern for practical reasons. As for specialist carers, how many of those are you going to find that are actually up to the job! My concern is, I volunteer in several places and I am always amazed at how many incompentent managers there are and who gave them the jobs.So in a delicate situation like this if the heartless people that have made this decision will let a team of parents of disabled children choose the candidates they would think suitable for this very demanding job rather than their choices at least that would be showing they are considering the parents in all this rather than the main issue of saving money. Lady Tinky Winky
  • Score: 10

8:58am Fri 31 Jan 14

gingin says...

The situation is all extremely worrying. Good points Lady Tinky Winky

I notice Karl you mentioned that magic figure again of £500,000 > seems that comes up quite a bit when WC try's to justify any cuts or savings!!!!!!!!!!!!
The situation is all extremely worrying. Good points Lady Tinky Winky I notice Karl you mentioned that magic figure again of £500,000 > seems that comes up quite a bit when WC try's to justify any cuts or savings!!!!!!!!!!!! gingin
  • Score: 5

11:33am Fri 31 Jan 14

Richard Clewer says...

The granite is much less slippery when wet than the other surfaces in the city centre. Every stone surface which is wheelchair friendly is slippery when icy.

There are no excuses about spending the £3 million on the Market Place. It was a choice of spend it in Salisbury, or give half of it back to government and spend the rest in another town in the County. That is not a choice in my opinion.

Granite was the only surfacing identified by experienced urban planners which would deal with the weight. The cheaper alternative was tarmac, not the sort of surface we wanted for the centre of the city. If you have any evidence of other cheaper surfaces which would not crack under the weight that would work (Compacted Earth perhaps?) please let us know.
The granite is much less slippery when wet than the other surfaces in the city centre. Every stone surface which is wheelchair friendly is slippery when icy. There are no excuses about spending the £3 million on the Market Place. It was a choice of spend it in Salisbury, or give half of it back to government and spend the rest in another town in the County. That is not a choice in my opinion. Granite was the only surfacing identified by experienced urban planners which would deal with the weight. The cheaper alternative was tarmac, not the sort of surface we wanted for the centre of the city. If you have any evidence of other cheaper surfaces which would not crack under the weight that would work (Compacted Earth perhaps?) please let us know. Richard Clewer
  • Score: -2

12:58pm Fri 31 Jan 14

Richard Clewer says...

Fair point Tinky Winky. I am inclined to agree with you on the stability issue. My understanding is that the Clinical Commissioning Group are not reducing the budget at all here but changing the way the service is provided. The flip side to that is that if budgets are not cut they could have left things as they are.

It is not simple and I would not want to second guess the professionals but I am uneasy. The delay in closure is the minimum they needed to do to make it work.
Fair point Tinky Winky. I am inclined to agree with you on the stability issue. My understanding is that the Clinical Commissioning Group are not reducing the budget at all here but changing the way the service is provided. The flip side to that is that if budgets are not cut they could have left things as they are. It is not simple and I would not want to second guess the professionals but I am uneasy. The delay in closure is the minimum they needed to do to make it work. Richard Clewer
  • Score: -3

5:56pm Fri 31 Jan 14

karlmarx says...

gingin wrote:
The situation is all extremely worrying. Good points Lady Tinky Winky

I notice Karl you mentioned that magic figure again of £500,000 > seems that comes up quite a bit when WC try's to justify any cuts or savings!!!!!!!!!!!!
I find it totally unbelievable that every 'saving' works out to the same magic figure of £500,000. Different schemes, different services, different locations, different buildings, different staffing levels, same figure, £500,000, amazing!!
[quote][p][bold]gingin[/bold] wrote: The situation is all extremely worrying. Good points Lady Tinky Winky I notice Karl you mentioned that magic figure again of £500,000 > seems that comes up quite a bit when WC try's to justify any cuts or savings!!!!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]I find it totally unbelievable that every 'saving' works out to the same magic figure of £500,000. Different schemes, different services, different locations, different buildings, different staffing levels, same figure, £500,000, amazing!! karlmarx
  • Score: 2

6:05am Mon 3 Feb 14

karlmarx says...

"What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand."

Salisbury is a medieval city and as well as having a historic cathedral Salisbury has a history going back over many centuries. Visitors and tourists enquire about the cathedral, when it was built, what it is made from, who built it, designed it etc...
The market square? " who made the stones and where did they come from, the Mendips, the Cotswolds?"
Err, well they are made in China actually by um, I can't actually pronounce their name, sorry.
So, medieval city yes, Chinese paving slabs, out of place in a medieval city.

They actually look like the colour scheme of B&Q or Wickes back garden patio paving slabs.

Finally and most importantly

Natural stone is a major industry in China

The research identified serious problems in the area of health and safety. The most common injuries are cuts and bruises to the hands, as well as crushed fingers, among those moving heavy slabs and stones. In the province of Fujian, there is also a high risk of silicosis. Since silicosis is a lethal disease, work towards its prevention is extremely important.

Workers themselves mostly emphasise that they would like to earn higher wages. Note that production workers are paid on a piece rate basis whereas auxiliary workers, such as guards and packers, usually earn a fixed daily wage. Another priority of workers is adequate insurance against work-related accidents, something that was in place at a few factories, though more common in the quarries.

Regarding other aspects of working conditions, a few companies provide written employment contracts, but others do not. Workers in relatively dangerous cutting operations are often not employed directly, but are subcontracted by section leaders. Most companies operate seven days per week during a large part of the year. Overtime is also a regular feature at many companies and therefore average working weeks could range between 56 and 77 hours. If companies pay a premium rate for overtime, as required by law, this is only applied to evening work and not to Sundays.

It can be concluded that some major actions need to be taken for Chinese stone suppliers to achieve compliance with core International Labour Organisation (ILO) conventions and with Chinese labour legislation. Since demands for increasing compliance with such norms throughout the supply chain can be expected from European municipalities in the near future, there exists a strong business rationale for natural stone suppliers to improve working conditions and document the improvements. Many suppliers seemed aware of the challenges that lie ahead and some had already started to improve working conditions.
"What is it that you have against Chinese Granite by the way, I still don't understand." Salisbury is a medieval city and as well as having a historic cathedral Salisbury has a history going back over many centuries. Visitors and tourists enquire about the cathedral, when it was built, what it is made from, who built it, designed it etc... The market square? " who made the stones and where did they come from, the Mendips, the Cotswolds?" Err, well they are made in China actually by um, I can't actually pronounce their name, sorry. So, medieval city yes, Chinese paving slabs, out of place in a medieval city. They actually look like the colour scheme of B&Q or Wickes back garden patio paving slabs. Finally and most importantly Natural stone is a major industry in China The research identified serious problems in the area of health and safety. The most common injuries are cuts and bruises to the hands, as well as crushed fingers, among those moving heavy slabs and stones. In the province of Fujian, there is also a high risk of silicosis. Since silicosis is a lethal disease, work towards its prevention is extremely important. Workers themselves mostly emphasise that they would like to earn higher wages. Note that production workers are paid on a piece rate basis whereas auxiliary workers, such as guards and packers, usually earn a fixed daily wage. Another priority of workers is adequate insurance against work-related accidents, something that was in place at a few factories, though more common in the quarries. Regarding other aspects of working conditions, a few companies provide written employment contracts, but others do not. Workers in relatively dangerous cutting operations are often not employed directly, but are subcontracted by section leaders. Most companies operate seven days per week during a large part of the year. Overtime is also a regular feature at many companies and therefore average working weeks could range between 56 and 77 hours. If companies pay a premium rate for overtime, as required by law, this is only applied to evening work and not to Sundays. It can be concluded that some major actions need to be taken for Chinese stone suppliers to achieve compliance with core International Labour Organisation (ILO) conventions and with Chinese labour legislation. Since demands for increasing compliance with such norms throughout the supply chain can be expected from European municipalities in the near future, there exists a strong business rationale for natural stone suppliers to improve working conditions and document the improvements. Many suppliers seemed aware of the challenges that lie ahead and some had already started to improve working conditions. karlmarx
  • Score: 0

10:57am Mon 3 Feb 14

gingin says...

This is off topic of Hillcote but as the granite paving slabs are mentioned a lot I have a comment to make.

I know absolutely nothing of what is best for paving slabs but do know granite is supposed to be very hard wearing. Having said that in my opinion the Market Place has improved from what the look was before however it is all a bit uniform > it could have done with some form of feature to break up the light colour.

I understand it was the public's wish not to have any sort of water feature however having just visited Malta and in the middle of Valletta is a square in granite paving slabs with a water feature in the middle. This is not an old fashioned fountain where cans and rubbish can be thrown into it but a dozen or so short stacks where the water rises to no more than two feet in the air then drops and the water runs into gullies and is reused for the next cycle.

I thought this quite attractive and it broke up the uniform of the one colour.

This is a personal opinion it is not meant to be negative and I am aware of what comments will come my way as to why a water feature would not have been a good idea for Salisbury , but until you have seen one then you can have little idea of how good it actually looked!
This is off topic of Hillcote but as the granite paving slabs are mentioned a lot I have a comment to make. I know absolutely nothing of what is best for paving slabs but do know granite is supposed to be very hard wearing. Having said that in my opinion the Market Place has improved from what the look was before however it is all a bit uniform > it could have done with some form of feature to break up the light colour. I understand it was the public's wish not to have any sort of water feature however having just visited Malta and in the middle of Valletta is a square in granite paving slabs with a water feature in the middle. This is not an old fashioned fountain where cans and rubbish can be thrown into it but a dozen or so short stacks where the water rises to no more than two feet in the air then drops and the water runs into gullies and is reused for the next cycle. I thought this quite attractive and it broke up the uniform of the one colour. This is a personal opinion it is not meant to be negative and I am aware of what comments will come my way as to why a water feature would not have been a good idea for Salisbury , but until you have seen one then you can have little idea of how good it actually looked! gingin
  • Score: 4

8:15am Tue 4 Feb 14

Richard Clewer says...

Personally I am inclined to agree about the water feature. The fountain in the much smaller square in Chinon for example is a great feature which children play in and around.

Having said that the public view was very much not in favour of any water feature.

I am hoping we will get a feature put in on the Maltings site in one of the 'park' areas there
Personally I am inclined to agree about the water feature. The fountain in the much smaller square in Chinon for example is a great feature which children play in and around. Having said that the public view was very much not in favour of any water feature. I am hoping we will get a feature put in on the Maltings site in one of the 'park' areas there Richard Clewer
  • Score: 2

11:29am Tue 4 Feb 14

Grampie says...

Richard Clewer wrote:
Personally I am inclined to agree about the water feature. The fountain in the much smaller square in Chinon for example is a great feature which children play in and around.

Having said that the public view was very much not in favour of any water feature.

I am hoping we will get a feature put in on the Maltings site in one of the 'park' areas there
There is a water feature already at the Maltings site.

It is called a river.
[quote][p][bold]Richard Clewer[/bold] wrote: Personally I am inclined to agree about the water feature. The fountain in the much smaller square in Chinon for example is a great feature which children play in and around. Having said that the public view was very much not in favour of any water feature. I am hoping we will get a feature put in on the Maltings site in one of the 'park' areas there[/p][/quote]There is a water feature already at the Maltings site. It is called a river. Grampie
  • Score: -3

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