Five-year badger jab project starts

A FIVE-year programme of badger vaccinations has started on selected Dorset Wildlife Trust reserves, ahead of a possible cull in 2014.

The trust aims to demonstrate a safe, humane alternative to badger culling as the government’s controversial pilot culls fail to meet its targets – but is due to be extended.

DWT says it wants to see the eradication of the devastating disease Bovine Tuberculosis and understands the serious effects on farmers who lose stock.

But it believes there are more effective and reliable ways of controlling the disease such as better biosecurity, badger vaccination and in the long term, cattle vaccination.

They say badger vaccination has the potential to reduce bTB without increasing the transference of the disease among infected and healthy badgers and cattle that culling would bring.

“We were extremely disappointed to see the government drive forward with the badger cull in Somerset and Gloucestershire in August this year,” said Dr Simon Cripps, chief executive of Dorset Wildlife Trust. “The recent news that the pilot culls in Gloucestershire and Somerset have finished with low numbers of badgers being shot, strengthens the need for the government to support alternative methods to culling.

“Our understanding from Defra is that if badger culling continues despite these failures, shooting in Dorset is highly likely to start in 2014.

“Thanks to our successful badger vaccination appeal, Dorset Wildlife Trust is pleased to be able to start a vaccination programme on selected nature reserves in Dorset, to both protect badgers and support farmers,” he said.

A small team of volunteers and staff completed a badger vaccination course run by the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency and a licence was obtained from Natural England.

Humane traps baited with peanuts were set on some of the 40-plus reserves and the animals were vaccinated and released unharmed as quickly as possible.

There is more information and video clips on www.dorsetwildlifetrust.org.

Comments (4)

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2:21pm Fri 27 Dec 13

Frogham Ferret says...

DEFRA's figures show bovine TB went down this year - and that's before the stupid cull started. Better farm hygiene works
DEFRA's figures show bovine TB went down this year - and that's before the stupid cull started. Better farm hygiene works Frogham Ferret

8:17am Sat 28 Dec 13

Charles Henry says...

The Merck Veterinary Manual covering all aspects of Vet Medicine worldwide comments:

"The BCG vaccine, sometimes used to control TB in man, has proved to be poor at protecting most animal species, and inoculation often provokes a severe local granulomatous reaction."

This is likely to be a quite hurtful process and the vaccination site itself might well end up as an abscess.. As seen in trials, one cannot trap more than 60% of all badgers roaming around. Therefore if 60 out of 100 badgers are vaccinated with a vaccine which is only efficient to a maximum of 50 - 80% ( in healthy animals! ) you end up with far less than 50 badgers with a rather dubious protection.

It is well known and common practice that if you do not succeed to vaccinate up to 95% of all animals of a target species, the long term positive effects in an area are likely to be pretty close to zero.

. . . Dr Ueli Zellweger MRCVS GST TVL. Somerset


Badgers and bovine TB.

This is the REAL science.

The INDISPUTABLE, historically accurate, scientific facts.

http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?feature=pla
yer_embedded&v=ra8qT
xD3Wbw (open in a new window)
The Merck Veterinary Manual covering all aspects of Vet Medicine worldwide comments: "The BCG vaccine, sometimes used to control TB in man, has proved to be poor at protecting most animal species, and inoculation often provokes a severe local granulomatous reaction." This is likely to be a quite hurtful process and the vaccination site itself might well end up as an abscess.. As seen in trials, one cannot trap more than 60% of all badgers roaming around. Therefore if 60 out of 100 badgers are vaccinated with a vaccine which is only efficient to a maximum of 50 - 80% ( in healthy animals! ) you end up with far less than 50 badgers with a rather dubious protection. It is well known and common practice that if you do not succeed to vaccinate up to 95% of all animals of a target species, the long term positive effects in an area are likely to be pretty close to zero. . . . Dr Ueli Zellweger MRCVS GST TVL. Somerset Badgers and bovine TB. This is the REAL science. The INDISPUTABLE, historically accurate, scientific facts. http://www.youtube.c om/watch?feature=pla yer_embedded&v=ra8qT xD3Wbw (open in a new window) Charles Henry

8:17am Sat 28 Dec 13

Charles Henry says...

The Merck Veterinary Manual covering all aspects of Vet Medicine worldwide comments:

"The BCG vaccine, sometimes used to control TB in man, has proved to be poor at protecting most animal species, and inoculation often provokes a severe local granulomatous reaction."

This is likely to be a quite hurtful process and the vaccination site itself might well end up as an abscess.. As seen in trials, one cannot trap more than 60% of all badgers roaming around. Therefore if 60 out of 100 badgers are vaccinated with a vaccine which is only efficient to a maximum of 50 - 80% ( in healthy animals! ) you end up with far less than 50 badgers with a rather dubious protection.

It is well known and common practice that if you do not succeed to vaccinate up to 95% of all animals of a target species, the long term positive effects in an area are likely to be pretty close to zero.

. . . Dr Ueli Zellweger MRCVS GST TVL. Somerset


Badgers and bovine TB.

This is the REAL science.

The INDISPUTABLE, historically accurate, scientific facts.

http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?feature=pla
yer_embedded&v=ra8qT
xD3Wbw (open in a new window)
The Merck Veterinary Manual covering all aspects of Vet Medicine worldwide comments: "The BCG vaccine, sometimes used to control TB in man, has proved to be poor at protecting most animal species, and inoculation often provokes a severe local granulomatous reaction." This is likely to be a quite hurtful process and the vaccination site itself might well end up as an abscess.. As seen in trials, one cannot trap more than 60% of all badgers roaming around. Therefore if 60 out of 100 badgers are vaccinated with a vaccine which is only efficient to a maximum of 50 - 80% ( in healthy animals! ) you end up with far less than 50 badgers with a rather dubious protection. It is well known and common practice that if you do not succeed to vaccinate up to 95% of all animals of a target species, the long term positive effects in an area are likely to be pretty close to zero. . . . Dr Ueli Zellweger MRCVS GST TVL. Somerset Badgers and bovine TB. This is the REAL science. The INDISPUTABLE, historically accurate, scientific facts. http://www.youtube.c om/watch?feature=pla yer_embedded&v=ra8qT xD3Wbw (open in a new window) Charles Henry

7:12pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Champers says...

I'm not expert but how about vaccinating the cattle then? Or is this like Foot and Mouth? A question of economics?
I'm not expert but how about vaccinating the cattle then? Or is this like Foot and Mouth? A question of economics? Champers

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