Equine chiropractors meet

Veterinary physiotherapist Dr Gail Williams (right) demonstrates equine chiropractic techniques with the help of Verwood vet Beth Cameron at Arniss Equestrian Centre, Godshill

Veterinary physiotherapist Dr Gail Williams (right) demonstrates equine chiropractic techniques with the help of Verwood vet Beth Cameron at Arniss Equestrian Centre, Godshill

First published in Rural Focus

LAST weekend saw the inaugural conference of the British Veterinary Chiropractic Association at the Arniss Equestrian Centre at Godshill in the New Forest.

The association has been set up to promote the highest standards in animal chiropractic and in response to an increasing demand from both animal owners and their primary veterinary surgeons for veterinary chiropractic treatment.

The conference was organised by local mobile referral vet Beth Cameron, who specialises in chiropractic and acupuncture treatment for all animals. She said: “Animal chiropractic is a gentle, effective integrated treatment which, when used in conjunction with good traditional veterinary care, will provide years of healthy living for pets, horses and farm animals.”

Sixteen delegates from as far away as Northern Ireland gathered to share knowledge and to gain experience in further integrative treatments such as physiotherapy, stretching, massage and myofacial release techniques. Delegates also heard lectures on herbal medicine and canine spinal disease and surgery. A thought-provoking presentation by Dorsetbased vet Anna Wood on the subject of hospice care for old and terminally ill pets made for stimulating discussion.

Saturday was spent under the instruction of Dr Gail Williams BA (Hons) V.Phys.

PhD MASSVAP. Delegates furthered their knowledge on the assessment of equine biomechanics and the use of adjunct therapies to improve the gait and performance of horses.

Members of the BVCA are all fullyqualified veterinary or human chiropractors who have undergone further training in animal chiropractic techniques. They have passed independent international exams and practise to the highest standards.

They use their hands to identify areas of restriction by assessing all the joints in an animal’s body (particularly the spine) for full and correct movement.

Ms Cameron said: “The additional therapies learned this weekend will give us more to take back to the animals, enhancing our chiropractic treatments and enabling us to treat the animals’ condition from a greater perspective.”

Beth Cameron operates a mobile service in Dorset, Hampshire, Wiltshire and the surrounding areas.

For further information, visit naturallybalancedvetcare.co.uk.

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