Maltings and Central car park redevelopment would be "right for Salisbury"

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DEVELOPERS have pledged to make the regeneration of the central car park and Maltings area of Salisbury “right for Salisbury”.

Gary Bourne, director of development firm Stanhope, told an extraordinary meeting of Salisbury Area Board held at South Wilts School on Thursday that the project is a “once in a lifetime opportunity” and will create a “catalyst for redevelopment”.

The multi-million pound scheme would involve new shops and leisure facilities as well as public open space, housing, parking and the opening up and rejuvenation of the riverside area.

Following public consultation the developer has added a bus and coach interchange to its plans and confirmed it is possible the city’s library will relocate as part of moves to improve the link between the area and the Market Place via Market Walk.

Alistair Cunningham, Wiltshire Council’s associate director for economic development and planning services, said: “At the moment we are looking at a number of options for the library.”

He said the options include a new building within the development, perhaps as part of a “cultural quarter” but stressed that the facility will be kept within the city centre.

Concerns were raised by members of the public about plans to get rid of long-stay parking at the site, leaving only short-stay and the impact on those parking in central car park and catching trains to London.

Mr Cunningham said: “It has long been the policy that we don’t want car parks in the centre of Salisbury to be filled up with people going to London. We want them to stay in Salisbury. It is not new, and it is nothing to do with Stanhope.”

Architect Simon Hudspith from Panter Hudspith said his firm has already worked on similar city centre regeneration projects next to sensitive buildings in cities including Oxford, Cambridge, York, Lincoln and Hereford.

He said: “We have spent 20 years working in cathedral cities. We have an understanding and respect for the cities we work in and take inspiration from the buildings that have been there for hundreds or thousands of years.

“We are looking at how this can be brought into modern buildings that are looking forward rather than being a pastiche.”

Consultation is still ongoing on the project, which would bring up to 700 new jobs and affordable homes to the city.

The developer hopes to submit a planning application towards the end of next year with the project to be completed in phases over two years.

Comments (7)

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12:48pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Old Salisbury Boy says...

BUS and COACH interchange?

Local councillors are talking about keeping the bus station and parking the Coaches in Brown St.

We'll end up with more places for bus and coach parking than empty park and ride sites at this rate!!
BUS and COACH interchange? Local councillors are talking about keeping the bus station and parking the Coaches in Brown St. We'll end up with more places for bus and coach parking than empty park and ride sites at this rate!! Old Salisbury Boy
  • Score: 6

2:04pm Mon 24 Mar 14

whiteparishoner says...

Quote from article above:

"Concerns were raised by members of the public about plans to get rid of long-stay parking at the site, leaving only short-stay and the impact on those parking in central car park and catching trains to London.

Mr Cunningham said: “It has long been the policy that we don’t want car parks in the centre of Salisbury to be filled up with people going to London. We want them to stay in Salisbury. It is not new, and it is nothing to do with Stanhope.”

So, Mr Cunningham, where do the people who wish to travel on the train for a daylong visit somewhere park their cars? The station car park is full at 07:30. Don't say that they shouldn't drive to the station - people will use their cars as this is a rural area with pretty useless public transport links.

Also, what about the visitor on Saturday who wants to shop and linger in the town centre as you desire? A maximum of 3 hours is not enough for a leisurely stroll round the shops and an early dinner. Park and Ride? Don't make me laugh. They are closed by 19:00.

Why is it that every project planned has the effect of making parking more difficult in the city? Is it social engineering?
Quote from article above: "Concerns were raised by members of the public about plans to get rid of long-stay parking at the site, leaving only short-stay and the impact on those parking in central car park and catching trains to London. Mr Cunningham said: “It has long been the policy that we don’t want car parks in the centre of Salisbury to be filled up with people going to London. We want them to stay in Salisbury. It is not new, and it is nothing to do with Stanhope.” So, Mr Cunningham, where do the people who wish to travel on the train for a daylong visit somewhere park their cars? The station car park is full at 07:30. Don't say that they shouldn't drive to the station - people will use their cars as this is a rural area with pretty useless public transport links. Also, what about the visitor on Saturday who wants to shop and linger in the town centre as you desire? A maximum of 3 hours is not enough for a leisurely stroll round the shops and an early dinner. Park and Ride? Don't make me laugh. They are closed by 19:00. Why is it that every project planned has the effect of making parking more difficult in the city? Is it social engineering? whiteparishoner
  • Score: 36

10:05pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Morello says...

Here we go again - "whiteparishioner" moaning about cars and parking.

When will you learn that Wiltshire Council has decided that you will not go to London in future.

The sooner you learn that cars are not for using, the more content you will be.

Mr Conning'em has decided.
Here we go again - "whiteparishioner" moaning about cars and parking. When will you learn that Wiltshire Council has decided that you will not go to London in future. The sooner you learn that cars are not for using, the more content you will be. Mr Conning'em has decided. Morello
  • Score: 19

3:41pm Tue 25 Mar 14

karlmarx says...

"affordable homes to the city."

Mmm, good idea but.....
"affordable homes to the city." Mmm, good idea but..... karlmarx
  • Score: -2

9:18am Wed 26 Mar 14

hillyanne says...

Reduce parking rate,support the shops we already have(before anymore shut)tidy up the central carpark and reserve an area for cars and buses using the rail station.
We don't need a grandiose scheme like the one propOsed.Also,we really can't afford it,can we?
Reduce parking rate,support the shops we already have(before anymore shut)tidy up the central carpark and reserve an area for cars and buses using the rail station. We don't need a grandiose scheme like the one propOsed.Also,we really can't afford it,can we? hillyanne
  • Score: 9

10:50am Wed 26 Mar 14

Richard Clewer says...

Parking remains the major outstanding issue over the Maltings plans as shown by the comments above. It seems to me that we have got to retain some long stay parking in the city centre (the old engine shed site is still a possible location for that) and make sure that enough parking remains.

At the moment the data on parking usage shows that on average we use about half of the city centre parking spaces. That goes up a bit on Saturdays. On Saturdays before Christmas usage is up to over 80%. Culver Street is particularly badly used and to help that we are about to open it up with free parking on Sundays (I have just had confirmation from Cabinet that our request there has been approved).

Park and ride is also important but needs longer opening hours to work effectively in the future.

The Maltings will be funded by the developers using private money so will be of no cost to the tax payer. There will be a benefit in terms of uplift and planning gain however (personally I am pushing for a second phase to the hoppa bus which will be coming in with the Campus).

The question of how many shops we can support is an interesting one. I think we need to at least listen to the private sector here. Companies will not open new shops if they don't think they will be a success. Salisbury currently looses shoppers to surrounding areas. An improved range of shops combined with excellent restaurants (the quality of city restaurants is getting really good now) and leisure activities will bring more people into the city.

Before anyone mentions it, the fly in this ointment is parking charges and we are working on that at the moment. Getting the right balance there will be really hard.

As far as the comments about travel to London go, It strikes me that it is surely down to network rail to provide parking spaces to their customers wanting to pay large amounts to go to London on the train. I know in reality that does not happen and we have got to look at it as the local authority but I really think it is time Network Rail started behaving like a more responsible corporate citizen. They have closed down the idea of an interchange at the north entrance to the station and won't even open it to commuters because of their own staff parking. I would have thought a company should put its customers first there. Perhaps the engine shed site as a car park would help with staff parking for network rail as well.
Parking remains the major outstanding issue over the Maltings plans as shown by the comments above. It seems to me that we have got to retain some long stay parking in the city centre (the old engine shed site is still a possible location for that) and make sure that enough parking remains. At the moment the data on parking usage shows that on average we use about half of the city centre parking spaces. That goes up a bit on Saturdays. On Saturdays before Christmas usage is up to over 80%. Culver Street is particularly badly used and to help that we are about to open it up with free parking on Sundays (I have just had confirmation from Cabinet that our request there has been approved). Park and ride is also important but needs longer opening hours to work effectively in the future. The Maltings will be funded by the developers using private money so will be of no cost to the tax payer. There will be a benefit in terms of uplift and planning gain however (personally I am pushing for a second phase to the hoppa bus which will be coming in with the Campus). The question of how many shops we can support is an interesting one. I think we need to at least listen to the private sector here. Companies will not open new shops if they don't think they will be a success. Salisbury currently looses shoppers to surrounding areas. An improved range of shops combined with excellent restaurants (the quality of city restaurants is getting really good now) and leisure activities will bring more people into the city. Before anyone mentions it, the fly in this ointment is parking charges and we are working on that at the moment. Getting the right balance there will be really hard. As far as the comments about travel to London go, It strikes me that it is surely down to network rail to provide parking spaces to their customers wanting to pay large amounts to go to London on the train. I know in reality that does not happen and we have got to look at it as the local authority but I really think it is time Network Rail started behaving like a more responsible corporate citizen. They have closed down the idea of an interchange at the north entrance to the station and won't even open it to commuters because of their own staff parking. I would have thought a company should put its customers first there. Perhaps the engine shed site as a car park would help with staff parking for network rail as well. Richard Clewer
  • Score: 4

9:21pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Schoolmum999 says...

I don't think this is the place to affordable housing. This is one of the few large spaces in Salisbury city centre where development could create significant long term commercial and social benefit for the local community.

It is however essential that this opportunity is not squandered. The site is perfect for the inclusion of a modern and welcoming combined bus station and coach station. This would alleviate the streets around the city and remove the ridiculous idea of using Brown Street. It has direct links to the ring road, it is close to the railway station and could also have a picturesque walk towards the cathedral and wider city centre for tourists. If the proposal is allowed to just be shops and restaurants, I would urge people to object.
I don't think this is the place to affordable housing. This is one of the few large spaces in Salisbury city centre where development could create significant long term commercial and social benefit for the local community. It is however essential that this opportunity is not squandered. The site is perfect for the inclusion of a modern and welcoming combined bus station and coach station. This would alleviate the streets around the city and remove the ridiculous idea of using Brown Street. It has direct links to the ring road, it is close to the railway station and could also have a picturesque walk towards the cathedral and wider city centre for tourists. If the proposal is allowed to just be shops and restaurants, I would urge people to object. Schoolmum999
  • Score: 7

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