Civic Society objects to Sainsbury's plan

First published in News by

THE Civic Society in Salisbury has added its voice to chorus of concern being raised about the plan to build a new Sainsbury’s store in the city.

The Gateway project would see a new supermarket built opposite the Tesco store off Southampton Road, with parking, a petrol station, road alterations and a wetlands area.

But people living in the city fear it would add to existing traffic problems on the busy Southampton Road and increase the risk of flooding.

Last week Salisbury Vision publically confirmed its reservations about the project, and Salisbury Civic Society has now expressed its “strong opposition” to the application.

It objects on the grounds of the impact on the city centre, the concentration of too many supermarkets in one area, the impact on the landscape and the future implications for the eastern side of the city.

Chairman Peter Dunbar said: “The potential exists for a positive gateway to the city, emphasising the natural rather than the built environment.

“Achievement of this depends on a strategic, wide0ranging approach, not one based on seeking commercial advantages from one particular site.”

The developers say alterations to the Bourne Way roundabout and other road improvements will make traffic better rather than worse and that its efforts to store and release water gradually back into the river will mean flooding will not be any more of a risk than it is now.

They have said no other suitable site exists and that they want to be in close proximity to Tesco.

But the Civic Society fears a development would have a detrimental impact on the plan to revamp and revitalise the Maltings and Central car park area of the city centre.

“The proposed retail-led development of the Maltings and central car park is seen by planners as important for the commercial vitality of the city centre and is written into planning policy as a key element within the South Wilts Core Strategy.

“The superstore idea has no such official backing and the society sees it as a challenge to the Maltings and central car park scheme and likely to be damaging to the retail health of the city centre.

Sainsbury’s has an existing store in the Maltings and says it plans to remain in the city centre.

Ross Castle, portfolio development manager at Sainsbury’s, said: “Sainsbury’s has been investing in Salisbury for over 25 years and remains committed to improving the city centre store as part of the wider Central Car Par /The Maltings development.”

The planning application number is 14/03690/FUL and it can be viewed on the council’s website.

Comments (1)

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3:35am Wed 11 Jun 14

karlmarx says...

"The developers say alterations to the Bourne Way roundabout and other road improvements will make traffic better rather than worse and that its efforts to store and release water gradually back into the river will mean flooding will not be any more of a risk than it is now."

An insult to the intelligence of Salisbury residents!

If the proposed store expects zero customers then I agree, the traffic situation would be better, not worse.
Natures weather patterns do as they want and it is rather foolish and naive to think that you can alter this. If we are expected to believe that Sainsbury can store all of the water mother nature is able to throw at us and then release it gradually back into the water table then we are indeed being taken for suckers.
A gentle reminder from history of the dangers reality poses...

"Your highness, there is nothing you cannot do," someone would smile.

"Great Canute, you are the monarch of all," another would sing. "Nothing in this world dares to disobey you."

The king was a man of sense, and he grew tired of hearing such foolish speeches.

One day he was walking by the seashore, and his officers and courtiers were with him, praising him as usual. Canute decided to teach them a lesson.

"So you say I am the greatest man in the world?" he asked them.

"O king," they cried, "there never has been anyone as mighty as you, and there never be anyone so great, ever again!"

"And you say all things obey me?" Canute asked.

"Absolutely!" they said. "The world bows before you, and gives you honor."

"I see," the king answered. "In that case, bring me my chair, and we will go down to the water."

"At once, your majesty!" They scrambled to carry his royal chair over the sands.

"Bring it closer to the sea," Canute called. "Put it right here, right at the water's edge." He sat down and surveyed the ocean before him. "I notice the tide is coming in. Do you think it will stop if I give the command?"

His officers were puzzled, but they did not dare say no. "Give the order, O great king, and it will obey," one of then assured him.

"Very well. Sea," cried Canute, "I command you to come no further! Waves, stop your rolling!. Surf, stop your pounding! Do not dare touch my feet!"

He waited a moment, quietly, and a tiny wave rushed up the sand and lapped at his feet.

"How dare you!" Canute shouted. "Ocean, turn back now! I have ordered you to retreat before me, and now you must obey! Go back!"

And in answer another wave swept forward and curled around the king's feet. The tide came in, just as it always did. The water rose higher and higher. It came up around the king's chair, and wet not only his feet, but also his robe. His officers stood before him, alarmed, and wondering whether he was not mad."
"The developers say alterations to the Bourne Way roundabout and other road improvements will make traffic better rather than worse and that its efforts to store and release water gradually back into the river will mean flooding will not be any more of a risk than it is now." An insult to the intelligence of Salisbury residents! If the proposed store expects zero customers then I agree, the traffic situation would be better, not worse. Natures weather patterns do as they want and it is rather foolish and naive to think that you can alter this. If we are expected to believe that Sainsbury can store all of the water mother nature is able to throw at us and then release it gradually back into the water table then we are indeed being taken for suckers. A gentle reminder from history of the dangers reality poses... "Your highness, there is nothing you cannot do," someone would smile. "Great Canute, you are the monarch of all," another would sing. "Nothing in this world dares to disobey you." The king was a man of sense, and he grew tired of hearing such foolish speeches. One day he was walking by the seashore, and his officers and courtiers were with him, praising him as usual. Canute decided to teach them a lesson. "So you say I am the greatest man in the world?" he asked them. "O king," they cried, "there never has been anyone as mighty as you, and there never be anyone so great, ever again!" "And you say all things obey me?" Canute asked. "Absolutely!" they said. "The world bows before you, and gives you honor." "I see," the king answered. "In that case, bring me my chair, and we will go down to the water." "At once, your majesty!" They scrambled to carry his royal chair over the sands. "Bring it closer to the sea," Canute called. "Put it right here, right at the water's edge." He sat down and surveyed the ocean before him. "I notice the tide is coming in. Do you think it will stop if I give the command?" His officers were puzzled, but they did not dare say no. "Give the order, O great king, and it will obey," one of then assured him. "Very well. Sea," cried Canute, "I command you to come no further! Waves, stop your rolling!. Surf, stop your pounding! Do not dare touch my feet!" He waited a moment, quietly, and a tiny wave rushed up the sand and lapped at his feet. "How dare you!" Canute shouted. "Ocean, turn back now! I have ordered you to retreat before me, and now you must obey! Go back!" And in answer another wave swept forward and curled around the king's feet. The tide came in, just as it always did. The water rose higher and higher. It came up around the king's chair, and wet not only his feet, but also his robe. His officers stood before him, alarmed, and wondering whether he was not mad." karlmarx
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