Salisbury JournalMassive emission cuts 'necessary' (From Salisbury Journal)

If you have a story call our newsdesk on 01722 426511 or email us. To advertise call 01722 426500.

Massive emission cuts 'necessary'

Salisbury Journal: Substantial reductions in greenhouse gases will be needed to avoid 'dangerous' climate change, the IPCC has warned Substantial reductions in greenhouse gases will be needed to avoid 'dangerous' climate change, the IPCC has warned

Massive cuts to greenhouse gas emissions are needed in the next few decades to avoid "dangerous" climate change, a major international report has warned.

Output of carbon dioxide and other climate-changing gases has increased in recent years, despite efforts to tackle global warming, the latest study from the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found.

It is still possible to keep global temperature rises to no more than 2C above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century, the level at which it is thought dangerous impacts of climate change will be felt.

But substantial reductions in greenhouse gases will be needed, through large-scale changes to energy supplies and use, as well as curbing deforestation and planting forests.

Emissions need to be reduced by 40% to 70% on 2010 levels by the middle of the century and to near zero by 2100, to make it likely temperatures will not go above 2C, the report said.

This will require a shift away from investment in fossil fuels and a three- or four-fold increase by 2050 in the share of energy from low-carbon sources such as renewables, nuclear and power plants fitted with technology to capture and store carbon underground.

By the end of the century fossil fuel power plants without carbon capture and storage will need to be virtually phased out.

Measures will be needed to make transport cleaner, improve energy efficiency in homes, offices and industries and change behaviour to reduce energy demand, the report said.

Ambitious efforts to cut emissions could also involve growing crops which take in carbon dioxide and then burning them for energy in power plants fitted with carbon capture and storage technology, to actively take emissions out of the atmosphere.

Steps need to be taken immediately, as delaying action even to 2030 increases costs and makes it harder to keep temperatures from rising to dangerous levels, the report warned.

Emissions have increased by 2.2% a year between 2000 and 2010, compared to 0.4% a year between 1970 and 2000, with the recession in 2007-8 only temporarily putting the brakes on.

A failure to take more action than is already planned to curb greenhouse gases leaves the world at risk of temperatures soaring 3.7C to 4.8C by 2100, the experts warned.

The report from the IPCC on mitigating climate change is the third part of a wide-ranging international review into the issue.

The second part of the research, published two weeks ago and which focused on climate impacts, warned that the effects of rising temperatures were already being felt across the world.

Without action, climate change would increasingly threaten security, health and food supplies, exacerbate poverty and damage species and habitats, the report into the impacts of global warming said.

Otto Edenhofer, one of the experts leading the latest review, said: "Climate policies in line with the two degrees Celsius goal need to aim for substantial emission reductions.

"There is a clear message from science: To avoid dangerous interference with the climate system, we need to move away from business as usual."

He added that the review had found many pathways that led to a future which kept the world within the 2C goal.

"All of these require substantial investments. Avoiding further delays in mitigation and making use of a broad variety of technologies can limit the associated costs," he said.

Global growth is expected to be between 1.6% and 3% a year, and ambitious moves to reduce emissions would curb the increase by just 0.06 percentage points, the report suggests.

There could be negative side-effects of tackling climate change, the report says, but the economic estimates do not include the benefits of curbing rising temperatures.

There are also other advantages to cutting emissions, such as reducing air pollution which would improve human health.

Following publication of the report which involved hundreds of experts from around the world, environmental campaigners called for a shift away from fossil fuels to cleaner energy to drive down emissions.

Experts also called for swift action to tackle emissions. Dr Charlie Wilson of the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the UEA-based Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, said: "If we delay a concerted global effort to reduce climate change, it will lead to increased future costs, reduced flexibility, and an increased reliance on commercially unproven technologies.

"By contrast, taking immediate action to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy demand would be cost-effective, feasible, and it would provide multiple benefits to the economy, public health, and the environment."

Prof Sir Brian Hoskins, director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London, said: "The science shows us that we need substantial and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions if we are to limit the risks posed by climate change.

"This is not that difficult - we already have the technologies that are required and they will get better and cheaper in the years to come.

"Potential competitiveness issues, affecting a small number of very energy intensive industries, can be handled. We should stop wringing our hands and just get on with it."

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:49pm Sun 13 Apr 14

welshmen says...

When the rest of the worlds manufacturing countries emissions match ours then charge us more of the Climate Change Green money scam, until then sick it where the sun still shines....
When the rest of the worlds manufacturing countries emissions match ours then charge us more of the Climate Change Green money scam, until then sick it where the sun still shines.... welshmen
  • Score: 1

11:05pm Sun 13 Apr 14

mixxer says...

It'll never happen, the USA relies on the "petrodollar" for it's very existence. If the demand for fossil fuel collapsed so would the US economy so we're doomed to a near future of not only using oil but waging wars to gain control of the dwindling reserves.
It'll never happen, the USA relies on the "petrodollar" for it's very existence. If the demand for fossil fuel collapsed so would the US economy so we're doomed to a near future of not only using oil but waging wars to gain control of the dwindling reserves. mixxer
  • Score: -1

10:06am Wed 16 Apr 14

save energy says...

More alarmist ( “increasing threat of climate change” ) nonsense!!

Met office, NASA & NOAA, observed data sets all agree that, beyond natural variation, there has been NO change in climate & show there has been NO change in global temperatures for the last 17 yrs,

Please believe the data....not the politics !!

So - Let’s IGNORE the politics & look at the science -

1 - CO² induced Catastrophic Climate Change.
To put the “carbon” scare into perspective: CO2 has increased from about 3 parts in 10,000, to only 4 parts in 10,000 — in 150 years. -

CO2 is not a pollutant, it’s a very tiny trace gas, currently just 0.000397 of the atmosphere, but it is essential to all life on earth.
There is no scientific evidence proving that CO2 is anything but a completely harmless trace gas, which is very beneficial to the biosphere – At current and projected concentrations, more CO2 is better, as it promotes increased plant growth with less water use.

CO2 has been up to 20X higher in the past, when life on earth flourished & the planet was REALLY green.

2 -Global mean temperature change
Look at This chart - http://tinyurl.com/p
538a54 - showing ‘IPCC climate model projections’ versus ‘Observed climate data’.( Met office data sets) + CO² levels.
Red = IPCC climate model projections. (+1.67°C/century)
Black = Observed climate data.( Met office data )
Grey = CO2 ppm.
Blue = global mean temperature change. (-0.30°C/century)

& if 9yrs is too short for you…..how about 354 years of met office data –

This chart @ - http://tinyurl.com/n
jwnor8 - shows central England temps from 1659-2013.
Take note of 1695- 1735 (40yrs) - a 2°C rise occurred.
What happened in that time? Farming & food production expanded exponentially, health improved, and the age of enlightenment really took off.

The next 2°C rise took 121yrs (1892-2013), what happened in that time?
Massive industrialization & us.

3 -Global mean sea rise.
We have one of the longer running tide gauges at North Shields, which shows sea levels have been steadily rising at 1.91mm/year since 1890 = 7.5”/century.
see - http://tidesandcurre
nts.noaa.gov/sltrend
s/sltrends_global_st
ation.shtml?stnid=17
0-053

Has that all made a difference ??
Well - 2013 was the same temperature as 1666 !!!....with a few fluctuations in-between.

For the met office data sets, see – http://tinyurl.com/8
727btc

A useful primer-
CO2 & Global temperatures Murray Salby’s Hamberg Lecture- 68mins, start @ 3mins
Very clear explanation & good graphics, easy to understand.
http://www.youtube.c
om/watch?feature=pla
yer_embedded&v=2ROw_
cDKwc0
More alarmist ( “increasing threat of climate change” ) nonsense!! Met office, NASA & NOAA, observed data sets all agree that, beyond natural variation, there has been NO change in climate & show there has been NO change in global temperatures for the last 17 yrs, Please believe the data....not the politics !! So - Let’s IGNORE the politics & look at the science - 1 - CO² induced Catastrophic Climate Change. To put the “carbon” scare into perspective: CO2 has increased from about 3 parts in 10,000, to only 4 parts in 10,000 — in 150 years. - CO2 is not a pollutant, it’s a very tiny trace gas, currently just 0.000397 of the atmosphere, but it is essential to all life on earth. There is no scientific evidence proving that CO2 is anything but a completely harmless trace gas, which is very beneficial to the biosphere – At current and projected concentrations, more CO2 is better, as it promotes increased plant growth with less water use. CO2 has been up to 20X higher in the past, when life on earth flourished & the planet was REALLY green. 2 -Global mean temperature change Look at This chart - http://tinyurl.com/p 538a54 - showing ‘IPCC climate model projections’ versus ‘Observed climate data’.( Met office data sets) + CO² levels. Red = IPCC climate model projections. (+1.67°C/century) Black = Observed climate data.( Met office data ) Grey = CO2 ppm. Blue = global mean temperature change. (-0.30°C/century) & if 9yrs is too short for you…..how about 354 years of met office data – This chart @ - http://tinyurl.com/n jwnor8 - shows central England temps from 1659-2013. Take note of 1695- 1735 (40yrs) - a 2°C rise occurred. What happened in that time? Farming & food production expanded exponentially, health improved, and the age of enlightenment really took off. The next 2°C rise took 121yrs (1892-2013), what happened in that time? Massive industrialization & us. 3 -Global mean sea rise. We have one of the longer running tide gauges at North Shields, which shows sea levels have been steadily rising at 1.91mm/year since 1890 = 7.5”/century. see - http://tidesandcurre nts.noaa.gov/sltrend s/sltrends_global_st ation.shtml?stnid=17 0-053 Has that all made a difference ?? Well - 2013 was the same temperature as 1666 !!!....with a few fluctuations in-between. For the met office data sets, see – http://tinyurl.com/8 727btc A useful primer- CO2 & Global temperatures Murray Salby’s Hamberg Lecture- 68mins, start @ 3mins Very clear explanation & good graphics, easy to understand. http://www.youtube.c om/watch?feature=pla yer_embedded&v=2ROw_ cDKwc0 save energy
  • Score: 2

6:21pm Mon 5 May 14

Dan Soton says...

ICL Prof Sir Brian Hoskins says we should stop wringing our hands and just get on with it."



In the meantime... a few years from now I will have a phone with an Air Pollution app which will tell me if Southampton's traffic pollution is exceeding EU legal limits if so it will automatically fine all the reasonable parties...


Read on.. The EU is backing ( Doable Project) low cost continuous pollution monitoring via mobile phones..



YOU AND I WILL MONITOR THE ENVIRONMENT

Environmental information about CO2, airborne dust and pollen will no longer be collected only at isolated measuring stations. From now on, cyclists, bus drivers and the man in the street will be able to do their bit.

Twenty portable sensors will be issued to volunteers in the city and to employees such as traffic wardens who are exposed to urban pollution at work.

By Åse Dragland

24 Feb 2014

"AT PRESENT, ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS ARE MADE USING EXPENSIVE STATIONS SPREAD AROUND THE COUNTRY. HOWEVER, NOW THAT EVERYBODY HAS A MOBILE PHONE, AND WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY, WE OURSELVES CAN CONTRIBUTE WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF DATA," SAYS ARNE BERRE AT SINTEF ICT.

"More and better information is particularly valuable on days of high pollution or high pollen counts. Making their own measurements will get the general public involved in their own environment. Everybody can now receive useful feedback about the conditions around us.

"TECHNOLOGY WILL BE DEVELOPED BY WAY OF THE EU PROJECTS CITI-SENSE AND CITI-SENSE-MOB. THESE WILL ENABLE ORDINARY PEOPLE TO COLLECT ENVIRONMENTAL DATA. Research scientists from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) and SINTEF are already well under way with the Norwegian contribution."

SENSORS ABOARD BUSES

"We are now having discussions with Oslo Municipality about fitting buses with sensors to measure air quality along the roads. The bus drivers themselves will also find this information useful as they will see how acceleration and driving style affects the results and can learn to drive in a more ecologically friendly way" says Berre.

Magne Elvik, Operations Manager at Nobina Oslo Vest, confirms that sensors will be tested aboard two gas-powered buses at the beginning of April on routes around Grorud, Sinsen and Oslo Central Station, as well as out to Fornebu. If the tests go according to plan, a further eight buses will be included in the experiment.

ON STREETLAMPS AND ELECTRIC BIKES

Last year was mostly dedicated to testing new technology and getting everything to function so that data could be obtained for later use. The actual measurements will take place in the coming months.

Nuria Castell at NILU says that a total of 40 static sensors will be deployed in Oslo. "Air quality is a matter of public concern in Norway, too," she says. "We will fit sensors to streetlamps, for example, to cover city centre areas where pollution is high, and will also monitor neighbourhoods adjacent to Ring Roads 2 and 3, and at Bygdøy.

Twenty portable sensors will be issued to volunteers in the city and to employees such as traffic wardens who are exposed to urban pollution at work. The citizens of Oslo will also be able to measure air quality when cycling, and at least one sensor will be fitted to an electric bike.

"Admittedly there have been some delays," Castell confirms, "But we are starting this spring with two buses, a bicycle and five fixed sensors. By the end of the summer we aim to have full distribution involving more buses, and in the autumn all the fixed sensors will be installed, as well as those carried by people. Measurements will then be carried out in the city throughout 2015."

LAPEL BUTTONS

In December, SINTEF tested hand-held units for collecting weather and wind data as well as a small lapel button (see video) for measuring UV radiation.

"We have now sent the equipment to Bilbao for large-scale testing," says Arne Berre.

This is because around thirty partners in Europe are busy with measurements and tests. Among other things, they will provide both indoor and outdoor measurements of CO2 levels in schools. With such a large amount of data, the EU will be able to make comparisons and obtain a basis for developing joint solutions as well as for sharing technology.

The next step will deal with how to successfully involve people in future by means of user participation and work groups. The plan is to test the technology with selected individuals in 2014 and then make it more generally available during 2015.

See the www.citi-sense.eu and www.citi-sense-mob.e
u websites for further information.

KEY FACTS:

• The EU's Citi-Sense environmental project (2012-2016) will measure the pollution to which individual citizens are exposed. This is achieved using mini-sensors and other electronic equipment to collect environmental data for an online data register. The objective of the project is to improve quality of life in towns and cities. The project attempts to motivate the local population and improve awareness. 27 partner institutions from nine cities in Europe are involved. The project is headed by NILU.

• The EU's Citi-Sense-MOB project will run from 2013 to 2015 and involves installing sensors on mobile platforms (buses and bicycles) to make regular measurements. Each of the four Norwegian partners has its own principal focus – NILU on the quality of sensor data, SINTEF on integration towards global standards and data visualisation, Kjeller Innovation on the use of sensor data in other applications and UNIK on user involvement.

• THE SENSORS ARE MANUFACTURED BY VARIOUS EUROPEAN COMPANIES IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, SERBIA AND SPAIN.


http://www.sintef.no
/home/Press-Room/Res
earch-News/You-and-I
-will-monitor-the-en
vironment/



,,,
ICL Prof Sir Brian Hoskins says we should stop wringing our hands and just get on with it." In the meantime... a few years from now I will have a phone with an Air Pollution app which will tell me if Southampton's traffic pollution is exceeding EU legal limits if so it will automatically fine all the reasonable parties... Read on.. The EU is backing ( Doable Project) low cost continuous pollution monitoring via mobile phones.. YOU AND I WILL MONITOR THE ENVIRONMENT Environmental information about CO2, airborne dust and pollen will no longer be collected only at isolated measuring stations. From now on, cyclists, bus drivers and the man in the street will be able to do their bit. Twenty portable sensors will be issued to volunteers in the city and to employees such as traffic wardens who are exposed to urban pollution at work. By Åse Dragland 24 Feb 2014 "AT PRESENT, ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS ARE MADE USING EXPENSIVE STATIONS SPREAD AROUND THE COUNTRY. HOWEVER, NOW THAT EVERYBODY HAS A MOBILE PHONE, AND WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY, WE OURSELVES CAN CONTRIBUTE WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF DATA," SAYS ARNE BERRE AT SINTEF ICT. "More and better information is particularly valuable on days of high pollution or high pollen counts. Making their own measurements will get the general public involved in their own environment. Everybody can now receive useful feedback about the conditions around us. "TECHNOLOGY WILL BE DEVELOPED BY WAY OF THE EU PROJECTS CITI-SENSE AND CITI-SENSE-MOB. THESE WILL ENABLE ORDINARY PEOPLE TO COLLECT ENVIRONMENTAL DATA. Research scientists from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) and SINTEF are already well under way with the Norwegian contribution." SENSORS ABOARD BUSES "We are now having discussions with Oslo Municipality about fitting buses with sensors to measure air quality along the roads. The bus drivers themselves will also find this information useful as they will see how acceleration and driving style affects the results and can learn to drive in a more ecologically friendly way" says Berre. Magne Elvik, Operations Manager at Nobina Oslo Vest, confirms that sensors will be tested aboard two gas-powered buses at the beginning of April on routes around Grorud, Sinsen and Oslo Central Station, as well as out to Fornebu. If the tests go according to plan, a further eight buses will be included in the experiment. ON STREETLAMPS AND ELECTRIC BIKES Last year was mostly dedicated to testing new technology and getting everything to function so that data could be obtained for later use. The actual measurements will take place in the coming months. Nuria Castell at NILU says that a total of 40 static sensors will be deployed in Oslo. "Air quality is a matter of public concern in Norway, too," she says. "We will fit sensors to streetlamps, for example, to cover city centre areas where pollution is high, and will also monitor neighbourhoods adjacent to Ring Roads 2 and 3, and at Bygdøy. Twenty portable sensors will be issued to volunteers in the city and to employees such as traffic wardens who are exposed to urban pollution at work. The citizens of Oslo will also be able to measure air quality when cycling, and at least one sensor will be fitted to an electric bike. "Admittedly there have been some delays," Castell confirms, "But we are starting this spring with two buses, a bicycle and five fixed sensors. By the end of the summer we aim to have full distribution involving more buses, and in the autumn all the fixed sensors will be installed, as well as those carried by people. Measurements will then be carried out in the city throughout 2015." LAPEL BUTTONS In December, SINTEF tested hand-held units for collecting weather and wind data as well as a small lapel button (see video) for measuring UV radiation. "We have now sent the equipment to Bilbao for large-scale testing," says Arne Berre. This is because around thirty partners in Europe are busy with measurements and tests. Among other things, they will provide both indoor and outdoor measurements of CO2 levels in schools. With such a large amount of data, the EU will be able to make comparisons and obtain a basis for developing joint solutions as well as for sharing technology. The next step will deal with how to successfully involve people in future by means of user participation and work groups. The plan is to test the technology with selected individuals in 2014 and then make it more generally available during 2015. See the www.citi-sense.eu and www.citi-sense-mob.e u websites for further information. KEY FACTS: • The EU's Citi-Sense environmental project (2012-2016) will measure the pollution to which individual citizens are exposed. This is achieved using mini-sensors and other electronic equipment to collect environmental data for an online data register. The objective of the project is to improve quality of life in towns and cities. The project attempts to motivate the local population and improve awareness. 27 partner institutions from nine cities in Europe are involved. The project is headed by NILU. • The EU's Citi-Sense-MOB project will run from 2013 to 2015 and involves installing sensors on mobile platforms (buses and bicycles) to make regular measurements. Each of the four Norwegian partners has its own principal focus – NILU on the quality of sensor data, SINTEF on integration towards global standards and data visualisation, Kjeller Innovation on the use of sensor data in other applications and UNIK on user involvement. • THE SENSORS ARE MANUFACTURED BY VARIOUS EUROPEAN COMPANIES IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, SERBIA AND SPAIN. http://www.sintef.no /home/Press-Room/Res earch-News/You-and-I -will-monitor-the-en vironment/ ,,, Dan Soton
  • Score: 0
Post a comment

Remember you are personally responsible for what you post on this site and must abide by our site terms. Do not post anything that is false, abusive or malicious. If you wish to complain, please use the ‘report this post’ link.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree